November 2008

Grace for Mom

My wife worked for the first time since the kids were born this weekend and I was on full Dad duty, in charge of a nursing one year old and a four and half year old for three days.  It gave me a new level of appreciation for my wife and the role she has in our family.

What struck me the most was the hyper vigilance it took to stay ahead of everything going on.  While one kid was being fed, the other was pooping his pants.  I took care of the the meals, snacks, laundry, dishes, and the list went on and on. continue reading...

Mortgage Market Update

This is a bit of information that I received today from one of the people in my inner circle.  This is some good information to know about banks and mortgage lenders.  I know that this is a huge deal to a lot of Family First Entrepreneurs so I figured that I would share this with you all.

The Federal Reserve announced today a new program to purchase over $600 billion in MBS (Mortgage Backed Securities). continue reading...

Lifestyle Deisgn

Guest Post by Cory Huff, Publisher of AGoodHusband.net, HusbandsandDads.com

Reading Tim Ferriss’ book the Four Hour Work Week was a real eye opener for me.  The concept of Lifestyle Design is something that I could wrap my brain around fairly quickly.  I was stuck in a career that was going nowhere in an industry that is dying.  My financial outlook was grim and my time freedom was almost non-existent. continue reading...

How to Have Thanksgiving on a Budget

As family first entrepreneurs grow more and more cautious about how they spend money, my team and I have decided to search out, and make available, good cost saving information found online.  Our intent is to save you some time and money.

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, I felt this one to be both appropriate and timely. continue reading...

Work Can Feel Easier Than Family

As a committed father and the provider for my family, I would have to say that sometimes work feels easier than family.  As a result of my nature to gravitate toward the easy side, in this case, work, I find it necessary to keep myself in check by remembering what’s truly important.

I am writing this as a blog because I understand that for family providers, this subject is one that falls into the taboo, we-don’t-talk-about-this category. continue reading...

The Power to Walk Away

I find it interesting that in both relationships and business the power to walk away allows us to have true clarity.  When we are overly invested, we increase the possibility of making bad decisions.

The answer is loving separation. Simply said, you can still love someone or something with all your heart, but you need to separate yourself from that sometimes-blinding love in order to make sure you’re taking care of yourself with good decisions. continue reading...

How Dads Can Help Crib Training

Sue and I are in the middle of crib training with our second son Tucker. It has gone very well so far and I thought I’d blog about it because my readers have been asking for more information on the subject. continue reading...

Youthful Transition Moment

I was rewriting my bio recently and in doing research about what it should contain, I ran across some questions that I was supposed to ask myself to guide my writing. One of the questions asked, “What one event in your childhood had the greatest effect on your life?” My response to the question was a no-brainer. I repeated the fourth grade and the first three months of that school year taught me that I could be excellent. continue reading...

Discussion, not Negotiation

When I sit down at the table to cut a deal of almost any kind, I prefer to have a discussion as opposed to a negotiation.  They are very similar types of situations with similar outcomes, but a discussion feels a whole lot better to me.  When you’re negotiating, the person across the table becomes your adversary, and there are many people I know that love it that way.   On the other hand, I would rather pull back and allow a relationship to develop so a discussion is possible. continue reading...

Teaching Children Delayed Gratification

This is another interesting gem I got from my current read, Influencer—dry toast reading, but some awesome factoids.

In last night’s reading the author spoke of a thirty-year study done with children ranging from four to five years old.  He put them in a room with a clock, a table, and on the table was a marshmallow.  He told the children that the marshmallow was theirs to eat, but if he came back in ten minutes and it was still there, they would be given another one. continue reading...