Plodders

The economy that we are in today is rapidly disproving many established theories in business and investing. The only folks that are looking like geniuses right now are the most conservative, non-leveraged ones. I find that very interesting.

It’s the ones who were plodding along, investing in low-yield, long term investments and owned everything cash who still have a smile on their faces.  It’s the depression era investor who is going to survive the one we are moving into in one piece.

Even in the corporate world, books like Good to Great were held high as the book to end all books to guide corporations to success as a model.  Yet, many of those named “great” companies are now belly up or almost there.  Again….interesting.

What I think entrepreneurs have to look at right now is that we are in the perfect storm.  Something that can only happen if all the stars align.  Does that mean we spend our life preparing for the perfect financial storm? Preparing….yes. Obsessing…no. Just learn from the plodders. They have a proven model for long term wealth.  P.S. It’s probably your grandma or grandpa.  (Just obsess less than they did. It’s more fun.)

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First let me say that I love

First let me say that I love the title of your blog.

It's interesting to me that you mentioned looking at your granparents as a model and not necessarily your parents.  My grandparents lived and were business owners during the depression.  Not only did they teach us to live within our means, but the also stressed the importance on being a good neighbor.  The area that they lived in was quite rural.  All of the families in that area survived the depression quite nicely because they helped to take care of each other.  When one had crops to sell but no one had any money to buy the would barter services or simply give their neighbors food until they could afford to pay. Extending a hand when we can and accepting a hand when it's needed builds strong communities. Strong communities not only survive difficult times, they will often flourish.